Weighing Baby Vaccine Risks: Benefits of Vaccines

by , 02/13/12

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While folks were busy rooting for their favorite team at the Super Bowl, others were busy keeping a small outbreak of measles in check. In case you missed it, the Indiana State Department of Health has identified four cases of measles that may be related to the Super Bowl. The CDC was contacted and health officials are urging individuals to be aware of measles symptoms and to make sure they’re up-to-date on their vaccinations. Measles, also called rubeola, is highly contagious, causing fever, runny nose, cough and a rash all over the body. One out of ten children who contract measles also contract an ear infection, and up to one out of 20 gets pneumonia. Out of every 1,000 children who gets measles, one or two will die. Those figures may seem slight and not really very risky, but note that measles is on the rise. In 2000, the CDC noted that measles were pretty much eliminated in the U.S. and during 2001 to 2008 just 58 cases of measles, on average, were reported in the U.S. annually. Fast forward a few years though, and now the CDC reported 118 cases of measles during the first 19 weeks of 2011. Of those infected, 89% were also not vaccinated. This shows that while we can eradicate diseases to a point with vaccines, they can come back. It’s not just measles either. Many blame lower childhood vaccine rates for the increase of some other common diseases such as whooping cough. In any case, this entire situation brings up some good questions about vaccines and vaccine safety. It’s important that you weigh the risks of vaccines versus the risk of disease.

Do you think the benefits of vaccines outweigh the risks of vaccines?

  • 123 Votes Yes
  • 84 Votes No
  • 15 Votes I'm not sure

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alternative immunization schedule, vaccination schedule,anti-vaccination, are vaccines safe, cdc vaccine schedule,immunization schedule,immunizations, pro vaccination,recommended vaccines, disease risks, vaccines cons, weigh the risks of vaccines, vaccines are safe, vaccine risk, vaccine safety, vaccine schedule, wakefield vaccine, disease outbreaks

Image by Flickr User mak1e

Why Vaccinate?

Some parents don’t vaccinate their children. Maybe you’re thinking you won’t vaccinate either. That’s your right. However, you should also weigh the risks of not vaccinating, before you make this decision. When weighing the risk of vaccines for your child you should consider the following:

  • What is the likelihood of something going terribly wrong when your child does get a vaccine?
  • What is the likelihood of something going terribly wrong if your child doesn’t get vaccinated and instead contracts a possible deadly disease?
  • How dangerous are the diseases you can get if you’re not vaccinated?

According to research from most major health organizations, the diseases your child may contract if he’s not vaccinated are far more dangerous than the vaccine. For example, every single vaccine on the planet has potential side effects. Yet, all the diseases these vaccines protect against also carry side effects.  Plus, more children die each year due to infectious diseases than die from a negative vaccine reaction. As an example, the MMR vaccine poses a side effect risk of convulsions for 1 in 1000 individuals. Measles on the other hand poses a side effect risk of convulsions for 1 in 200 individuals.

The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VAERS specifically) receives around 30,000 reports of adverse vaccine reactions annually. Just 13% of the reactions are classified as serious (e.g., associated with disability, hospitalization, life-threatening illness or death). Before vaccines, 13,000 to 20,000 cases of paralytic polio, 100-150 chicken pox deaths, 600 meningitis deaths and 9,000 pertussis-related deaths occurred each year. That doesn’t cover all the other diseases vaccines protect against or the potentially long-term and painful side effects these diseases used to cause. Getting back to measles, the MMR vaccine causes a serious allergic reactions for one person for every million doses, but the disease itself used to kill 450 people annually in the U.S. alone.

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One Response to “Weighing Baby Vaccine Risks: Benefits of Vaccines”

  1. kari says:

    I think your argument is flawed. You have to compare apples to apples, and comparing kids getting hurt playing outside to kids getting injured by a vaccine is not apples to apples. And just because putting a child in a car is risky doesn’t mean we shoudl also expose them to the risks of vaccines. You don’t mention that there have been NO tests showing that it is safe to combine vaccines, which is common practice.

    Also, where are your resources for the numbers you quote. I recently read that Pertussis deaths had been dramatically reduced prior to the introduction of the vaccine. Please source your data so the reader can further educate herself.

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