The Many Downfalls of Kids’ Addiction to Tech: Why Limiting Screen Time Will Benefit Your Child

by , 07/01/13

computer addiction, get outside, green kids, green parenting, nature kids, screen free, screen addiction, tv dangers, screen dangers, health hazards of screens, screen time, too much screen time
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How Much Screen Time do Kids Really Have?

If you think most kids are using tech in moderation, think again. Consider the following shocking statistics:

  • Recent Rasmussen College research shows that 90% of all two year-olds have used a computer and 50% of five year-olds use a computer regularly.
  • Zero to Eight: Children’s Media Use in America(2011) shows that among babies to 8-year-olds, 27% of their screen time is spent on cell phones, video iPods, and iPad-style tablet devices. Zero to Eight further shows that kids under age 2 spend twice as much time looking at the TV as they do looking at books and more than 39% of children 8 and under live in homes where the television is left on all (10%) or most (29%) of the time, whether or not anyone is watching it.
  • Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8 to 18-Year-Olds, the largest on-going look at youth and media available today, shows that 8-18 year-olds devote an average of 7 hours and 38 minutes to entertainment media every day (more than 53 hours a week) not including texting. Because 7th to 12th grade kids also report spending an average of 1 and 1/2 hours a day sending or receiving texts, this means the average child is looking at screens for around 9 hours a day, or about 75% of their life (while awake).
  • A Nielsen 2010 study shows that American teens send or receive 3,339 texts a month. That’s 6+ texts per every hour they’re awake.

Worst of all, the Northwestern University (pdf) discussed above, shows that a full 55% of parents are not concerned with how much tech their kids use; 78% think that watching TV is a useful distraction for kids; 59% of parents aren’t worried about their kids becoming addicted to tech; and a majority of parents say that computer, TV, tablets and other tech media (besides video games) have a positive, not negative effect on children’s creativity and educational skills.

computer addiction, get outside, green kids, green parenting, nature kids, screen free, screen addiction, tv dangers, screen dangers, health hazards of screens, screen time, too much screen time
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Screen Time is Linked to Health Problems

Excessive screen use, such as kids are getting today, is linked to multiple long-term health issues. For example:

  • A recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) study shows that individuals who devote more than four hours a day to screens, including TV, video games or surfing the web have a 113% higher risk of heart attack and stroke and a 50% higher risk of death via any cause than people who spend fewer than 2 hours on screens per day. Oh, and even if an individual got plenty of exercise, the results were the same.
  • Tendonitis in wrists and neck pain are both linked to too much screen time.
  • Mindless snacking and overeating have both been linked to sitting and staring at screens.

While some research says that kids who watch more than two hours of TV a day are more likely to be overweight, it’s unclear just how much how screens affect weight. Still, consider that the CDC and other health organizations measure healthy activity levels on a scale of 0 to 10, 0 being the worst. Sitting ranks at 0, and sitting is what kids utilizing excessive screen time tend to do. Furthermore, the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans says that all kids and adolescents need 60 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity every day of the week. Most substantial research says you should get a lot more exercise though. With kids spending 75% of their waking hours on screens, it’s insanely unlikely most kids are getting the required amounts of exercise in. In turn, tons of available evidence says that sedentary behavior is directly linked to rising risks of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke.

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