High Levels of BPA Found in Campbell’s and Other Canned Kids Foods

BPA, BPA in Canned foods, Campbells, Chef Boyardee, Earth's Best, Annie's, Breast Cancer Fund

An alarming recent study has revealed the presence of BPA in popular canned food for kids, including Campbell’s Disney Princess and Toy Story Soups, which tested highest. BPA, which is present in the can’s linings and can be leeched into food, can cause serious health effects. In reaction to the findings, the Breast Cancer Fund is launching a campaign called “Cans Not Cancer,” to urge companies to eliminate BPA from their canning process. Read on to see which canned kids foods are the biggest BPA offenders.

BPA, BPA in Canned foods, Campbells, Chef Boyardee, Earth's Best, Annie's, Breast Cancer Fund
Although we’d hope that children across America are eating fresh, whole foods, the reality is most busy parents and babysitters turn to canned foods, as time and money permits. What’s alarming is the amount of canned soups, pastas or vegetables that a child eats in a week. If each one contains BPA, that can be very dangerous to their little bodies.

BPA, or bisphenol A, is an estrogenic chemical linked to breast cancer in adults. Studies suggest that repeated exposure may also cause prostate cancer, early puberty in girls, type-2 diabetes, obesity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). What’s more, early exposure is especially dangerous to children’s developing endocrine systems.

The canned foods that are of particular concern, with high levels of BPA measured in parts per billion (ppb) are:

Campbell’s Disney Princess Cool Shapes, Shaped Pasta with Chicken in Chicken Broth 114 ppb

Campbell’s Toy Story Fun Shapes, Shaped Pasta with Chicken in Chicken Broth 81 ppb

Earth’s Best Organic Elmo Noodlemania Soup, USDA Organic 38 ppb

Annie’s Homegrown Cheesy Ravioli, USDA Organic 31 ppb

Chef Boyardee Whole Grain Pasta, Mini ABC’s & 123′s with Meatballs 20 ppb

Campbell’s Spaghettios with Meatballs 13 ppb

The Breast Cancer Fund’s campaign is urging companies to opt for BPA-free can liners, which many companies have already done. For families on a budget and dealing with time constraints, the campaign suggests switching to dry or frozen pastas, soups and macaroni and cheese rather than canned versions.

Via Breast Cancer Fund

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